10 Things To Love About Buenos Aires

It was love at first sight.

Within a day or two of arriving in Buenos Aires, we knew we wanted to stay longer than the four weeks we had planned. We ended up staying for eight weeks and we still didn’t want to leave.

These are many reasons we fell in love with this amazing city and we think you will love it too. Here are 10 things to love about Buenos Aires:

1. It’s Paris Without the Price Tag

Buenos Aires is sometimes referred to as the Paris of South America. Granted, there is no Eiffel Tower, no Louvre, and everyone speaks Spanish. But the city, with its turn of the century architecture, has the ability to make you think you are in the city of lights.

Buenos Aires is full of wide boulevards, stately buildings, and massive monuments. Several times I had to remind myself that I wasn’t in Paris. I wasn’t even in Europe.

From the 1880s through the 1920s Buenos Aires was one of the richest, fastest-growing cities in the world and this is reflected in the magnificent architecture. Many neoclassical, art nouveau, and art deco masterpieces grace this city.

The French Embassy in Buenos Aires
My favorite building in Buenos Aires; the French Embassy

Click to view five more examples of beautiful Buenos Aires architecture:

2. Fabulous Food at Paltry Prices

Buenos Aires is teeming with excellent restaurants (steak and malbec anyone?) and we enjoyed many of them. These are three that we really loved:

La Cabrera

This restaurant has it all. Great food, great service, great atmosphere. Even better, they offer an early bird special that can’t be beat. Meals served between 6:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. get a 30% discount. This is on everything including drinks!

The rule is you must wait outside until 6:30. No reservations are taken for this time so you stand in line. Not to worry, it was a short line. And you must finish your meal by 8:00 so they can prepare for the 8:30 seating. The service is excellent so finishing in this time frame is no problem.

We visited this restaurant three times during our stay. And if we ever return to Buenos Aires it is one of the first places we will go.

On our first, visit I ordered the small tenderloin and an avocado, palm, and tomato salad. Imagine my surprise when two good-sized tenderloins and a huge salad were placed in front of me. I had enough left over for a second meal the next day. The glass of wine I ordered, listed as a cup on the menu, was actually a small bottle.

They also have killer desserts and everyone leaves with a lollipop from the lollipop tree:

A display of lollipops

In addition to the great food, we had a wonderful waiter. His name was Hugo Victor. He was our waiter for all three visits. On our last visit, we shared handshakes and hugs.

Chiquilin

Another good choice for steak is Chiquilin Restaurant in the San Nicolas neighborhood. The food and service were both wonderful.

Interior of Chiquilin restaurant
Charming decor and excellent food

Our superb meal for two with bread, main dishes, and drinks for two was $40 UDS.

Clark’s Steak House

We stumbled upon this restaurant after a visit to the Recoleta Cemetery. It didn’t look like much from the outside but turned out to be a great experience.

They have a fun decor, a variety of side dishes, and a wine named after me:

Food, wine, and fun decor
Processed with MOLDIV

Steaks, side dishes, wine, and coffee for two for only $30 USD.

3. The Faena Hotel and El Mercado Restaurant

Continuing with food, we love a good Sunday brunch buffet, but they can be hard to find in some cities. Our research led us to the El Mercado Restaurant in the Faena Hotel.

This hotel is in the Puerto Madero section of the city. If you take a taxi be sure to tell the driver you are going to the Faena Hotel. The first time we visited this restaurant we asked the driver to take us to El Mercado and were delivered to an actual market. We then had to catch a second taxi to get to the hotel.

Brunch is served in the hotel’s El Mercado restaurant every Sunday. You can choose to eat inside in a large room that looks like your rich great aunt’s parlor with lots of dark wood and cabinets filled with antiques or on the peaceful and elegant brick patio. And make sure to leave room for their amazing desserts.

You have two choices in food as well. You can have the buffet with meats, cheeses, salads, side dishes, desserts, and wine. Or you can add barbecue to your meals. We opted for the buffet without the barbecue and there was more than enough to chose from. At $75 USD for two the brunch was expensive compared to other meals we had, but well worth it.

The El Mercado restaurant dining room
The dining room at El Mercado
Red velvet cake and flan
Two of the delectable desserts

Be sure to check out the rest of this five-star hotel. The decor is over-the-top elegant.

Swimming pool with crown
A pool fit for a king
The Library Lounge
The Library Lounge
4. The Dedication of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

Before we visited Argentina I was unaware of the horrific terrorism that occurred there just 40 years ago. In 1976 Argentina’s government was overthrown by right-wing forces with U.S. support. Jorge Rafael Videla became president and not long after that Congress was disbanded.

The biggest legacy of this regime was the Dirty War. From 1976 – 1983 tens of thousands of people who were considered a threat to the regime were imprisoned, tortured, and often killed. It is estimated that 30,000 people disappeared during this time. They were often sedated, put on a plane, and dumped into the Rio de la Plata on routine death flights. One “secret” detention camp shared quarters with the Naval School of Mechanics which continued to operate as if nothing evil was going on within its walls.

Beginning in 1977 several mothers of the disappeared formed a group that to this day holds weekly marches in the Plaza de Mayo. They march in front of the presidential palace demanding to know what happened to their children, who were usually young adults when they disappeared. They are also working to make sure that all those responsible for this atrocity are held accountable.

When the group started it was illegal for more than three or four people to gather in public, so they marched around the plaza two-by-two. Pairs of stencils of white headscarves in the plaza commemorate the early marches.

Stenciled scarfs on the ground in Plaza de Mayo

There are only a few Mothers alive today. They still show up every Thursday afternoon at 3:30 wearing white headscarves that represent diapers.

Two of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo marching with supporters.
A weekly march in September 2019

You can learn more about The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo in this article published by The Guardian.

The ESMA Memory Site Museum is dedicated to preserving the memory of this terrible chapter in Argentine history.

5. Recoleta Cemetery

Recoleta Cemetery, in the neighborhood of the same name, is the final resting place of many notable Argentinians including Eva Perón.

Eva Peron’s tomb
Eva Peron is buried in the Duarte family tomb. It is one of the few gravesites that consistently has flowers.

You can read more about Evita, as she was affectionately known, and her long journey to the cemetery here.

We found it strange that the graves here do not contain information about the deceased like most in cemeteries. Instead, it is common to see plaques that honor the deceased for their civic work.

6. Puerto Madero

Like many cities, Buenos Aires has revitalized part of its waterfront. This area along the Rio de la Plata is called Puerto Madera.

It won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but if you are visiting Buenos Aires and want to put a little upscale and modern vibe into your day it is definitely worth a visit.

Cityscape of the Puerto Madero neighborhood
Some of the many modern high rises in this neighborhood

This port was built at the end of the 19th century but had a very short life. Within fifteen years it was virtually obsolete.

El Puente de la Mujer or Woman’s Bridge in Puerto Madero
El Puente de la Mujer or Woman’s Bridge is a rotating footbridge in Puerto Madero

The area spent most of the 1900s in neglect. Efforts to revitalize the area were started in the 1990s. Now you will find high rises, high-end hotels, and warehouses-turned-apartments.

This is so the area where you will find the Faena Hotel mentioned above.

This area also has the Buenos Aires Ecological Reserve. This 865 acres of low land on the Rio de la Plata is a great place for a stroll or a bike ride.

7. The Parks
The Japanese Gardens

There is no shortage of parks and gardens in Buenos Aires. One of our favorites was the Japanese Gardens.

This 5-acre garden is in the Palermo neighborhood surrounded by the bustling city. If you have trouble finding the entrance don’t give up. This oasis within the bustling city is truly a delight for the senses.

Linda in the Japanese Gardens
Me in the garden on a delightful spring day
Tres de Febrero Park and Rosedal

Another enchanting place to spend some time in the Palermo neighborhood is the Tres de Febrero Park (also known as the Bosques de Palermo). We visited this 988-acre park on a Saturday and it was bursting with activity including skaters, bikers, and walkers like us. There were small children learning to ride bikes and people dancing in a fitness class. There were also people paddle boating in the small lake:

A lake, an ornate white bridge, and paddle boats in the Tres de Febrero park

From my point of view, the best part was Rosedal. This expansive rose garden is part of the Tres de Febrero Park. Unfortunately, there weren’t any roses blooming during our visit, but I can imagine how glorious it must be when they are in bloom.

Jardin Botánico Carlos Thays

This rather small botanical garden (18 acres) in the Palermo neighborhood is a delightful way to put a little green in your day.

The park is named for French architect and landscape designer Carlos Thays who designed these gardens. He and his family lived in the mansion that is now used as the main building in the gardens.

Many abandoned cats roam the garden grounds. When efforts to stem the rate of abandonment failed a group of volunteers took over the feeding, neutering, and placement of the cats. Although we saw several cats in the gardens, none of them would pose for a photo.

The featured image in this article is of the greenhouse that is in the gardens.

8. It’s Close to Iguazu Falls

Iguazu Falls is the largest waterfall in the world and is shared by Argentina and Brazil. Each country has developed a national park around its portion of the falls.

From Buenos Aires, it is a short flight of less than two hours to get to Puerto Iguazu, Argentina and the Argentinian side of the falls. It is then no big deal to cross the border into Brazil to see the rest of the falls.

Of course, you could also fly to Foz do Iguazu, Brazil, but at the time we booked our flights that was a much more expensive option. Our round trip flights cost just under $200 each.

Another option is a bus ride of about 18 hours. Some of the buses offer partially or fully reclining beds.

Having grown up very close to Niagara Falls we debated whether or not to take this side trip from Buenos Aires. After reading online reviews we decided it was worth a shot. This side trip was the most expensive we have ever taken at $1,200 for three days, but we are glad we visited.

The day we spent visiting the Argentina side of the falls involved a lot of walking on very long trails. We visited in early October and it was a very hot 97 degrees Fahrenheit. Luckily, the humidity was low so it didn’t seem to bother us as much as most of the visitors. Thirty years in Florida’s hot, humid climate had acclimated us.

We spent another day viewing the falls from the Brazilian side. This park is more compact than the Argentinian one, which made the trails more crowded. This also made for a shorter visit so we had time to visit Parque Das Aves where we met this funky fellow:

Crowned crane

We highly recommend the fabulous Iguazu Jungle Lodge. We thoroughly enjoyed our three-night stay. Our room was beautiful and spotless, the scenery is sublime, and our meals at their restaurant we fantastic. Because of the weakness of the Argentina Peso we had a four-star experience with a two-star price tag. With a three-night stay costing only $260 USD.

Our room at the Iguazu Jungle Lodge
Isn’t this a gorgeous room?
9. The Dogs

If you are a dog lover I suggest you spend some time in the Palermo neighborhood. This area seems to have an extremely large number of dogs and dog walking is a popular job. It is not unusual to see groups of 5, 10, or even 15 dogs being walked or tied to a pole or fence while the walker picks up and drops off his charges.

A dog walker with 15 dogs
A common scene in the Palermo neighborhood

Just be careful where you walk. While most people pick up after their dogs, some do not. And the strays, who are harmless, also leave a mess behind.

As we have traveled around we have been amazed at how well behaved dogs in many parts of the word are. It is not uncommon to see a dog walking with his owner, without a leash, and ignoring other people and pets.

Many of them have been trained to cross the street. This dog walked ahead of his master, reached the street, and sat down without any prompting:

Large dog sitting on a city street

10.The Peaceful, Passionate Protests

One of the things we love most about traveling is experiencing cultural differences. Sometimes they may cause an inconvenience like the time we were detained for sixteen hours because of a protest that shut down a major highway in Peru. Even so, it is these events that round out our travel experience. It isn’t all good food and gorgeous buildings.

We were in Buenos Aires in the weeks leading up to a highly contested presidential election. Our first experience with protests there was when we moved from the Palermo neighborhood to the Congresso neighborhood. We spent our second four weeks in an apartment across from the National Congress building.

As the taxi drove us towards our new apartment the roads became more and more clogged until we couldn’t go any further. At that point, we were advised to walk to our destination. Only one problem. We didn’t know how to get there.

Long story short, protesters were blocking the roads so our host and his wife met us so they could help us carry our luggage to the apartment.

All of the protests we saw were peaceful. They sometimes seemed more like a block party on steroids. Vendors set up food carts and parents entertained small children on the sidelines.

These protests continued on a daily basis throughout the remainder of our stay.

One word of caution: Avoid walking through a large group. As we tried to work our way through a large crowd some people behind us started pushing. We made it through alright, but in hindsight, we should have walked around the protest area.

A group of protesters in Buenos Aires
One of the many groups protesting in front of the National Congress Building
In Conclusion

These are just 10 of the many highlights of our time in Buenos Aires. There are many other ways to enjoy this vibrant and cosmopolitan city. No matter what you look for when you travel, you are sure to find it here.

Trip Details

Dates: August 15, 2019 to October 10, 2019

Number of days: 56

Total cost: $7,200

Cost per day: $129

Further Reading

Buenos Aires was just one of the cities we visited during the ten months we spent in Latin America in 2019. To learn about some of the other places we visited be sure to check out Our Top 10 Latin American Highlights: 2019.

We have also detailed what these ten months cost in Our 2019 Latin American Travel Costs.

Stay safe and happy future traveling,
Linda

One Month in Cordoba, Argentina

October 2019 found us in Cordoba, Argentina’s second-largest city. We had just spent two months in Buenos Aires, Argentina’s capital and most populous city. It was our favorite Latin American city so far. We wondered how Cordoba would compare.

Cordoba didn’t steal our hearts the way Buenos Aires did. Even so, we had some good experiences and an awesome side trip to two little Alpine inspired villages. More on that later.

Our Favorite Thing in Cordoba

One of the coolest places in the city is the Sacred Heart Church of the Capuchin Fathers (pictured above at dusk).

We visited La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona last year and often feel that it ruined us for other churches. However, the Capuchino Church delighted us for hours. In addition to the beautiful pastel colors and a multitude of statues, there are gargoyles and numerous animals.

Detail of Capuchin Church
Animals flanking their patron saint, Francis of Assisi
Cat and mouse detail on the Iglesias de los Capuchinos
The delights never end

Tours of the church including the tower are available in Spanish and English. I highly recommend that you take one for a chance to see more of this beautiful church up close.

When we first arrived in Cordoba and I heard the name Capuchin Church I thought it had something to do with monkeys. This fountain right across the street definitely had something to do with that. It turns out that the Capuchins are an order of friars that are an offshoot of the Franciscans.

fountain with monkeys
Perhaps you can understand my confusion

Here is a cool video of the church by Lucas Nobile.

For more information about the Capuchin Church see this article by Albom Adventures.

Walking Tours and Bus Tour

When we arrive in a new city we like to take a hop-on-hop-off bus tour to get the lay of the land. We also like to take a free walking tour to learn some basic history and hopefully hear some good stories. Cordoba was no different.

What was different was the extremes in the quality of the tours. We took two walking tours with La Docta Tours. These were the best free tours we have ever had.  The guides were very knowledgeable and spoke excellent English.

If you are not familiar with the concept of a free tour, you take the tour and pay what you think it was worth at the end. Not really free, but they are usually very well done.

photo of the Cathedral in Cordoba
You will see the Cathedral in Plaza San Martin on the morning tour.
Ferris wheel
You will see the Rueda Eiffel, a defunct ferris wheel many believe was designed by Gustavo Eiffel, on the afternoon tour

The afternoon tour had a little something extra.  A dog named Negro joined us. According to our guide, he roams the city during the day and returns to his home each night. He is well known throughout Cordoba and loves strolling along with the afternoon tour. He even stayed with Steve and me while we ate dinner.

A dog named Negro
Negro, the tour-loving dog

As good as the walking tour was, that’s how bad the hop-on-hop-off tour was. As usual, we were given earbuds so we could tune into the English version of the tour. However, the bus played the Spanish version over speakers so it was very hard to hear the explanations coming through the earbuds. Annoying music filled the downtime. We do not recommend this tour.

Sarmiento Park

We had high hopes when we headed to Cordoba’s largest park, Sarmiento Park. They didn’t last long. The park has so much potential but is in disrepair.

Pond and bridge in Sarmiento Park
Sarmiento Park has so much potential

Despite this, the park was busy on the spring-like day we visited. There is a multitude of restaurants in the park for you to choose from.

Our favorite part of the park was the Super Park. This small amusement park was full of mostly happy kids and tired parents the day we visited. Well worth a visit of the young or the young at heart.

Two boys on bumper cars, one is crying
Someone didn’t like the bumper cars
What Are Those?

Not far from Sarmiento Park you will find a park full of large, colorful rings. This is Plaza del Bicentenario. It celebrates the country’s 200 year anniversary which occurred in 2010.

There are 201 rings in the park, one for each year and one that represents the future. Each ring has a date and an engraving of a notable event from that year.

Colorful rings in a park
Just some of the 201 rings in Bicentennial Park

This is certainly an eye-catching park. You can have fun photographing the rings from different angles.

Linda standing in a large ring
A beautiful day to play in the bicentennial rings
Some Really Good Eats

Be warned: the vast majority of restaurants close for several hours in the late afternoon and don’t open for dinner until 8 or 9 p.m. Since we like to eat dinner around 6 o’clock we visited several restaurants for lunch instead.

Our three favorites were:

The Pastrami Bar – This casual restaurant is located in the bohemian neighborhood of Guemes. It has a charming outdoor area and tasty down to earth food including, surprise, surprise, a wide variety of pastrami sandwiches.

There is a chance you won’t be able to eat at this restaurant in the near future. According to our waitress, they will be closing because of the high cost of rent.

Sandwich and chicken wings
Steve’s pastrami sandwich and my wings; health food not

The reason I’m including it here is to share this with you:

Calico cat
Phoebe, the resident cat at the Pastrami Bar

This lovable cat lives at the restaurant. Don’t worry, if they close she has a home to go to. And maybe they will find a way to stay open.

Sibaris – this classy place in the Hotel Windsor is not far from Plaza San Martin, the main square.

Not only was the food amazing, but you are served a small taste of an appetizer and one of dessert free with your meal.

Steak and vegetables
Tenderloin with roasted vegetables; I wish there was a way to put taste in a blog.
Flan
Flan with dulce de leche and whipped cream

El Celta – this restaurant specializes in fish and seafood but has plenty of other choices.  It is quite a few blocks north of Plaza San Martin, but within walking distance, if you love traveling on foot as we do.

Seafood and potato platter
This seafood platter with roasted potatoes for two was more than enough

We enjoyed these restaurants so much we visited each of them twice. In each case, the staff was wonderfully welcoming and often spoke English.

One Of Our Best Side Trips Ever

During our stay in Cordoba, we decided to visit the Calamuchita Valley, particularly the alpine-inspired villages of La Cumbrecita and Villa General Belgrano.

Our experiences in these two villages were quite different from each other, but both were wonderful.

La Cumbrecita is very small. Its population is less than 200 people! It is also a pedestrian town. Visitors are not allowed to drive in the town. Not to worry though. It is small enough to walk everywhere.

Four people on horseback
Quaintness overload

Knowing how small it was we only planned to stay for two nights which gave us one full day in town. We spent that entire day exploring the countryside. There are numerous paths just minutes from the center of town that will lead you to memorable views.

photo of a pond
One of the many rewards of our hike
Steve and I with a horse in the background
An impromptu photo, you can’t tell here but Steve was nervous about the horse because he had been bitten in the past

You need to take two buses to get to La Cumbrecita. The first stops in Villa General Belgrano. The total travel time is about three hours plus time spent between buses at the Villa General Belgrano station.

We traveled with Buses LEP and Pajaro  Blanco. The buses were very clean and comfortable.

Once you arrive at La Cumbrecita you will be only a few minutes’ walk from the center of town. Our hotel, Hotel Las Cascadas, was just a four-minute walk from the bus station. Reservations at this hotel include half board.  The food was very good and we were called to dinner by the ringing of a cowbell.

From Nature to Luxury

The second part of our side trip was spent at the Chamonix Posada and Spa in Villa General Belgrano. Our room was spacious and clean. The staff was very friendly and helpful. The restaurant serves three meals a day with a wide variety of very good food.

Since it was too cold to use the outdoor pool I spent many hours relaxing in the indoor pool. I usually avoid indoor pools because I find them to be dismal and cold. The indoor pool at Chamonix was warm and the room was full of light.

Me under waterfall in indoor pool
I loved the indoor pool at Chamonix Posada and Spa

This is also a good place to indulge in spa treatments. They are much less expensive than in the U.S.  An hour-long massage is $20 U.S.

Our Take On Cordoba

Cordoba is a compact and very walkable city. Like all the places we have visited in Latin America, the locals are friendly and helpful.

Young men in a pickup truck celebrating
Recent graduates celebrating; a common scene on the streets

We spent four weeks in Cordoba minus five days for our side trip. Two weeks would have been enough since there is a limited amount for tourists to do.

However, if we hadn’t visited Cordoba we would have never experienced La Cumbrecita. In fact, we wouldn’t even know it exists.

All in all, we are glad we made Cordoba a stop on our itinerary.

Where To Next?

We’re off to Medellin, Colombia. Time Magazine named this city the most dangerous in the world in 1988 due to the extraordinary power wielded by cocaine king Pablo Escobar and the Medellin cartel. While the extremely high crime rate dropped after the death of Escobar in 1993, the city continued to be plagued by violence perpetrated by various guerrilla groups including FARC. The government managed to demobilize the guerrilla groups in the early 2000s.  Medellin is now safer than many cities in the U.S.

Trip Details

Dates: October 10 – November 11, 2019

Days: 28

Total cost: $3,100

Cost per day: $111

Happy traveling,
Linda